Mr Darcy’s Diary by Amanda Grange

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Who would have thought Mr Darcy would keep a diary? Not me. However, Amanda Grange’s novel Mr Darcy’s Diary, has the taciturn hero of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice recording his version of events for posterity.

If Jane Austen had given her readers so much detail about Mr Darcy in Pride and Prejudice he would have lost a great deal of his appeal. As a romantic hero I found him far more attractive when I knew less about how his mind works. In My Darcy’s Diary the reasons for his behaviour are fully explained at every turn. Most of this is to his credit, but some girls (okay, me) like a bit of mystery.

A great many more conversations take place between Mr Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet (Mr Darcy never calls her Lizzie) and are recorded in Mr Darcy’s Diary than in Pride and Prejudice. Apart from the additional conversations, there isn’t a great deal of substance to this novel. Mr Darcy seems intelligent enough, but he is very often tongue tied by Elizabeth and his first attempt at proposing marriage to her is even clumsier and ruder than Jane Austen’s version.

Lydia is more of a hussy than I ever realised. George Wickham’s character is also less likeable when you learn more about him based on Darcy’s experiences. Anne DeBourgh’s character is also slightly expanded.

I recently read Captain Wentworth’s Diary by Amanda Grange and enjoyed this book far more than Mr Darcy’s version of Pride and Prejudice, probably because Captain Wentworth’s Diary expanded on Persuasion by telling of events before the hero and heroine met in Austen’s story.

Despite my complaints, the character’s voices are captured very well, and Mr Darcy’s Diary is an enjoyable read. This book is ideal for the Pride and Prejudice readers who aren’t quite ready to let go of their obsession with Mr Darcy.

Mrs Darcy. Mr and Mrs Fitzwilliam Darcy. Fitzwilliam. Dear Fitz. William. Will. Bill. Hmmm. That would make me the ideal reader.

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