Pikelets

pike

This recipe came from my mother-in-law, who makes lovely Pikelets.

When I was conned into making Pikelets for my workmates, I asked my mother-in-law for her recipe*. She told me, and I wrote down her instructions, word for word. Then she told me, that was the recipe, but this is what I do, and proceeded to tell me a whole different set of ingredients and methods. So I wrote down her version.

When I made Pikelets, I did what my mother-in-law did, not what the recipe said. The Pikelets worked out perfectly.

1 Cup Self-Raising flour

pinch salt

2 Tablespoons sugar

1 egg

1/2 Cup milk

Beat all ingredients together, then cook in butter in a hot frypan. Serve with jam and cream.

*Here is the recipe my mother-in-law doesn’t use. if you ever make it, let me know what it tastes like.

1 Cup Self-Raising flour

pinch salt

1/4 teaspoon Bi-carb soda

2 Tablespoons sugar

1 egg

1/2 Cup sour milk, or milk with 1 teaspoon of vinegar mixed in.

1 Dessert spoon of melted butter.

Beat all ingredients, then cook in butter in a hot frypan.

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8 Comments

  1. …are these pancakes?? I love the way different things have different names different places. You should definitely try them with blueberries dropped in while they are cooking. Delish!

    Reply
    • Yes, pikelets are tiny pancakes, about two bites. I’m always googling ingredients that have different names in different companies, for example, plain flour in Australia is all purpose flour in the US.
      I sometimes put berries in pancakes too, yum!

      Reply
      • It’s funny because I read a lot of books that were originally published in not-the-US-but-English-speaking countries, and I think I have a pretty good grasp on other-country English… and then I find out something ridiculous, like the first floor in Britain is actually the second floor in America (our first floor is the ground floor)!

      • Oh, Australia is even worse! Everything is a hodge-podge of either American or British, from spelling (British) naming conventions of floors (could be either, education facilities use American, all others British).

      • It’s no wonder that people complain about the difficulties of learning English… even when you think you know it, you may not!

      • And don’t even start on the grammar!

  2. Interesting! I’d say the ones you made are what we’d call Scottish pancakes, but the ones with the bicarb of soda would be what I’d think of as pikelets. (Not sure, though – I’d have to taste them both to know for sure…) I love pancakes…

    Reply
    • They are all good, no matter what they are called. I sometimes make big pancakes for Sunday breakfast, but the pikelets are more for morning or afternoon tea. No wonder my weight is increasing…

      Reply

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